Assignment 1

Asking for feedback from an industry professional.

I reconsidered my remake and came up with this one based on the tutor feedback after our online tutorial:

Remade assignment:

As suggested at a recent tutorial, this BoW has been considerably shortened and changed from the first SYP Assignment 1 submitted.  I have also revised how I present the letters since attending an exhibition by Alex Cecchetti in Bristol, and remembering the feedback in OCA SW’s student and tutor November 2017 exhibition in Wellington. At the OCA SW exhibition, I presented 3 diptychs in this layout and asked for feedback from the visitors:

Figure 1: A  Letter-writing themed diptych submitted for comment at the 2017 OCA SW November exhibition in Wellington, Somerset© Anna Goodchild. 2018

The contents highlighted in the extract from Ian’s letter were illustrated by the image.  There were 2 responses to my request, both of which suggested that I have a recording of the relevant extracts from the letters which would leave viewers free to look at the image.

The choices  of which images to make were determined by three of the many themes in the letters and the changing seasons.  The final selection will have 12 A3 images covering all the main themes in the letters.

I was not happy with the diptychs as the were because the aesthetic was wrong and they were too cluttered. 

Recently I went to an exhibition at Spike Island in Bristol where I saw the work of Alex Cecchetti  At the Gates of the Music Palace.

The work spoke to me in two ways: there was a physical interaction between the exhibits and the visitors in that there were movement sensors located in the space which activated a recording whenever a person walked past each exhibit.  Because the images with Ian’s letter extracts on them (see the link above to the first remake of assignment 1) are too cluttered for me, I will remove the readable letter extracts and, instead, try a motion sensor which triggers a recording of the reading of the extracts.  In that way, the aesthetic of the image is not affected and the message gets across.

The second way that Cecchetti’s installations spoke to me was that they included abstract images of lines and this inspired my ‘Fault line’ series which I have decided not to include in my BoW as they represent a development of ideas not strictly related to this BoW.

A 1 remake 3  Feb  72dpi  .png
Figure 2:  The references to the date of the letter and the extract have been removed.  A recording, triggered by a movement sensor, will read the date and the letter extract /s.  © Anna Goodchild. 2018.

To underline a sense of place, I added my images made from the dye made from material picked up outside HMP Dartmoor at different times of the year.  These are just 3 images of the 12 through which I am planning to develop the original BoW ideas.

Remake 4 combo February 2016 72dpi  .png
Figure 3: Winter. A diptych becomes a triptych.  ©  Anna Goodchild 2018.
A1 remake 4 May 72dpi .png
Figure 4: Spring.  © Anna Goodchild 2018
A1 remake 4 October 72dpi .png
Figure 5:   Autumn © Anna Goodchild. 2018
A 1 remake 4 artist's statement  72dpi .png
Figure 6:  My poem as my Artist’s statement.  © Anna Goodchild. 2018.

Why leaves?  Why not weeds?  

The bracts (leaf-like petals) of the Handkerchief tree (Davidia involucrata) 

Figure  7:  Davidia Involucrata.  © Anna Goodchild 2019.

symbolize surrender to me, as they hang white and limp from the branch.  Furthermore, when they are dried, you cannot see the difference between a bract and a leaf, just like you cannot tell, from people walking in a street, who has been in prison and who has not.  Other leaves are also acceptable  – I must use a greater variety, possibly from those plants growing outside Dartmoor prison, to give a sense of place?

Why not weeds?  Who decides which plant is a weed?  Blackberry plants are also called Brambles which, when they do not have fruit, are often considered weeds. Realising that there is beauty / ugliness in any plant or person, I decided not to discriminate against weeds and to use them in my work to depict the changing seasons.

There are no links in the letters to organic wellbeing but there are references to the weather, the climate and to the changing seasons in virtually every letter.  This, therefore, justifies the use of plant material in the project. Ian also comments on the plant material I have photographed in my cards / letters to him.  My photography work at LandWorks, complements the rehabilitation and therapeutic practices in many British prisons where prisoners are taught horticultural skills. At LandWorks,  prisoners on day-release tend the vegetables and flowers,  and look after the poultry.  They also learn new skills like pottery and woodwork.  All these aspects will appear in my cyanotype quilt.  

I am much happier with these images as combinations although the actual dye prints used may change as I collect more season-specific material.

The ideas may still evolve as I attend more exhibitions and hear how other professionals, like Edmund Clark and Jenny Wicks, develop their prison-related work.

Illustrations:

Figure 1: A Letter-writing themed diptych submitted for comment at the 2017 OCA SW November exhibition in Wellington, Somerset© Anna Goodchild. 2018

Figure 2:  The references to the date of the letter and the extract have been removed.  A recording, triggered by a movement sensor, will read the date and the letter extract /s.  © Anna Goodchild. 2018.

Figure 3: February.  ©  Anna Goodchild 2018.

Figure 4:  May. © Anna Goodchild 2018

Figure 5:  October.  © Anna Goodchild. 2018

Figure 6:  My poem as my Artist’s statement.  © Anna Goodchild. 2018.

Figure  7:  Davidia Involucrata.  © Anna Goodchild 2019

This was the original Assignment 1 sent to my tutor for comment.